Risks & Happiness & Careers

 
This guy seems to be pretty happy with his career.

This guy seems to be pretty happy with his career.

We're all told at a young age that college is the best route to a successful career. We're told if we want to be happy, have a stable income and a good life, we must pick a degree in something we're kinda good at and stick to it. Then we'll graduate, get a good job and make money, pretty babies and blah blah blah...happy life.

The problem with that however, is all of this is measured in how much money you make—not necessarily what makes you happy

Granted, "happiness" is different for everyone and money makes life a heck of a lot easier.

But, as we grow older and get to know ourselves a bit better, sometimes it becomes clear that our passions and our careers may not necessarily intertwine. And that's OK. Sometimes the solution is simply recognizing what makes us happy, and incorporating it somehow into our daily life via a hobby or side job. Others, may find themselves waking up from an "illusion" and feel compelled to just quit and start a new life. The first step in every case however, is honesty. 

I see a lot of that happening lately, and I think it's because of the skewed value system I mentioned earlier. Now, I'm not saying we need to take on the system or any other silly ideas of the like. I'm just saying it starts with introspection.

We can't be told what makes us happy, we can only find that for ourselves...and yes, turn it into a career if that so drives us. It takes a lot of risk. No seriously, it takes a lot more courage to take that risk than most people out there have. That's why a lot of people settle for "the average". BUT...if what makes you happy drives you to the edge of a cliff and you know you must jump or lose your soul down a path of dissatisfaction...

Jump.

Jump and don't look back. It's worth it. As a strategist, it's against my nature to do such things. I research and then I make decisions on said research. But the more I researched, the less I found answers and the more I found risk-takers who weren't afraid of failure...but I'll leave that topic for another blog post. 

 
Amy Baldis